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Frederik X Made The New King Of Denmark After Abdication Of Queen

Frederik X made the new king of Denmark after abdication of Queen, as Denmark's Prime Minister officially declared him the new king. A jubilant atmosphere enveloped the palace grounds, where massive crowds gathered to witness the historic moment of a beloved monarch passing the throne to her popular son after the formal abdication of Queen Margrethe II.

Alexander McCaslin
Jan 14, 2024607 Shares25310 Views
Frederik X made the new king of Denmark after abdication of Queen, as Denmark's Prime Minister officially declared him the new king. A jubilant atmosphere enveloped the palace grounds, where massive crowds gathered to witness the historic moment of a beloved monarch passing the throne to her popular son after the formal abdication of Queen Margrethe II.
At the age of 83, Queen Margrethe becomes the first Danish monarch in nearly 900 years to willingly step down from the throne. The succession event drew thousands of spectators and marked Denmark's first royal transition in more than 50 years. This change was unusual for monarchies because it wasn't the result of a reigning monarch passing away.
The roots of Denmark's monarchy trace back to the 10th-century Viking king Gorm the Old, making it the oldest in Europe and one of the oldest globally. While the royal family's responsibilities are largely ceremonial today, the occasion was significant in the nation's history.
Queen Margrethe formally signed her abdication during a meeting with the government at Christiansborg Palace in Copenhagen. The palace, a vast complex with historical significance, has served as the seat of Danish power for centuries, housing the Royal Reception Rooms, Royal Stables, Danish Parliament, the prime minister's office, and the Supreme Court.
From the palace balcony, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen joyously declared Frederik king before an exuberant crowd. Following tradition, Frederiksen read the proclamation three times, with Frederik standing by her side, dressed in a ceremonial military uniform embellished with medals. The new Australian-born Queen Mary and the couple's four children then joined them on the balcony, prompting a spontaneous rendition of the national anthem from the jubilant crowd.
My hope is to become a unifying king of tomorrow. It is a task I have approached all my life.- King Frederik
As per tradition, every new sovereign adopts a royal motto to serve as a guiding principle for their reign. Frederik's chosen motto is: "United, committed, for the kingdom of Denmark."
I want to return the trust I meet. I need trust from my beloved wife, you and that which is greater than us.- King Frederik
Frederik shared a kiss with Queen Mary, adorned in a white dress with a sash gracefully draped over one shoulder, eliciting another enthusiastic cheer from the crowd.
Exiting Christianborg Palace in a horse-drawn coach amid the ringing of church bells, they proceeded to their Amalienborg residence. Here, they reappeared before an exuberant crowd waving the national flag - a white cross on a red background. Touched by the moment, Frederik placed both hands on his heart in a gesture of gratitude.
Earlier, at a grand table covered in red cloth, the abdication document had been presented to Margrethe. Royals and members of the Danish government gathered around, with Frederik seated beside her, marking a significant moment in the royal transition.
King Frederik sitting as his mother Queen Margrethe walks aways
King Frederik sitting as his mother Queen Margrethe walks aways
Following the signing, Margrethe, adorned in a magenta skirt suit, stood and motioned for Frederik to assume her position. Using a cane for support, she gracefully exited the room, bidding farewell with the words, "God save the king."
The abdication ushers in a unique situation for Denmark, with two reigning queens: Margrethe retaining her title, while Frederik's wife assumes the role of Queen Mary. Additionally, Frederik and Mary's eldest son, the 18-year-old Christian, now assumes the esteemed position of crown prince and heir to the throne.
Citing healthconcerns, Margrethe delivered a surprising New Year's Eve announcement, revealing her decision to step down - an unexpected development in a nation accustomed to monarchs serving until the end of their days, in keeping with Danish tradition. The revelation came after Margrethe underwent significant back surgery in February, with her return to duties occurring in April.
Even the prime minister remained unaware of the queen's intentions until moments before the public announcement. Margrethe had disclosed her decision to Frederik and his younger brother Joachim just three days prior, according to the Berlingske newspaper, quoting the royal palace.
Citizens from all corners of Denmark converged outside the parliament, filling streets adorned with red-and-white Danish flags. Numerous shops displayed images of Margrethe and Frederik, and city buses donned small Danish flags, customary during royal events. Across the kingdom of nearly 6 million people, many tuned in to a live television broadcast, collectively witnessing this historic event.
Anders Pejtersen, 25, exclaimed, "It was worth the four hours wait." Traveling from Aalborg in northern Denmark, he made the journey to witness Frederik's proclamation. His mother, Helle Pejtersen, described the experience as "intense."
Marina Gregovic, a 32-year-old resident of Copenhagen, expressed her confidence in Frederik, stating, "I believe he will be fantastic. And we loved his speech."
Congratulations poured in from royals across Europe, including U.K. King Charles III, whose late mother Queen Elizabeth II, and Margrethe shared a familial connection as third cousins. Charles affirmed his commitment to maintaining a strong bond between their countries and families.
Earlier in the day, the royal guards' music band paraded through downtown Copenhagen, donning red jackets typically reserved for significant events instead of their usual black attire.
The voluntary abdication of a Danish monarch is a rare occurrence, with the last instance dating back to 1146 when King Erik III Lam stepped down to enter a monastery. Margrethe's abdication coincided with the day she ascended the throne in 1972 following the death of her father, King Frederik IX, on January 14.
Australians joined the festivities on the streets of Copenhagen to celebrate one of their ascending to the position of queen.
"I think it's good that she’s not from royalty and has a normal Australian background. We can relate more to that, because she’s from a middle-class background, and we are too," said Judy Langtree, who made the long journey from Brisbane with her daughter to witness the royal event.
A survey commissioned by Denmark's public broadcaster DR and published on Friday revealed that 79% of the 1,037 individuals polled by the Epinion polling institute believed that Frederik was well-prepared to assume the throne, while 83% expressed confidence in his wife Mary's readiness to become queen. DR reported a survey margin of error of 3 percentage points.

Conclusion

Despite the apparent contradiction with the egalitarian principles of modern-day Denmark, where hereditary monarchy may seem out of place, the royal family maintains significant popularity. The anti-monarchist movement in the country is relatively small.
"The republicans in Denmark have no future," former parliamentary Speaker Pia Kjærsgaard said on public television.
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