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Heart Disease And Food - Association With Dietary Fats And Carbohydrates

The most common cause of mortality among women is cardiovascular disease. Diet is both a risk factor for heart disease in and of itself and a contributor to the risk of other health issues and mortality, such as cancer and diabetes, in addition to heart disease.

Alexander McCaslin
Jan 03, 20231 Shares536 Views
Heart Disease And Food- The most common cause of mortality among women is heart disease. The link between heart disease and foodand death is debatable. Diet is both a risk factor for heart disease in and of itself and a contributor to the risk of other healthissues and mortality, such as cancer and diabetes, in addition to heart disease.
According to the American Heart Association, one in every three women in the United States dies due to heart disease. Various studies have found that the fats and carbohydrates in one's food are significant contributors to good heart health. Furthermore, study data has revealed that saturated and trans fats are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Does Fat Or Carbs Cause Heart Disease?

Secondary outcomes were myocardial infarctions, stroke, cardiovascular disease mortality, and non-cardiovascular disease death. Participants were divided into quintiles of nutrient consumption (carbohydrate, fat, and protein) based on the percentage of energy delivered by nutrients.
High carbohydrate consumption was linked to a higher risk of overall mortality, but total fat and certain kinds of fat were linked to a decreased risk of total mortality. Total fat and fat types were not related to cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular disease mortality; however, saturated fat was linked to stroke. In light of these findings, global dietary standards should be reviewed.
Research published in The Lancet Journal looked at people aged 35 to 70 in 18 countries, with a median follow-up of 74 years. Validated food frequency questionnaires were used to capture the dietary consumption of 335 people. Total mortality and serious cardiovascular events were the primary outcomes (fatal cardiovascular disease, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure).
Secondary outcomes were myocardial infarctions, stroke, cardiovascular disease mortality, and non-cardiovascular disease death. Participants were divided into quintiles of nutrient consumption (carbohydrate, fat, and protein) based on the percentage of energy delivered by nutrients.
High carbohydrate consumption was linked to a higher risk of overall mortality, but total fat and certain kinds of fat were linked to a decreased risk of total mortality. Total fat and fat types were not related to cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular disease mortality. However, saturated fat was linked to stroke. In light of these findings, global dietary standards should be reviewed.

How Do Fats Contribute To Cardiovascular Disease?

Saturated fat is a kind of fat found in foods. Along with trans fat, it is one of the harmful fats. At room temperature, these lipids are usually solid. Saturated fat is abundant in foods such as butter, palm and coconut oils, cheese, and red meat. A diet high in saturated fat can contribute to heart disease and other health issues.
Healthy fats are required by your body for energy and other activities. However, too much saturated fat can lead to cholesterol buildup in your arteries (blood vessels). Saturated fats boost LDL (bad) cholesterol levels. High LDL cholesterol raises your chances of developing heart disease and stroke.

Are Carbohydrates Linked To Heart Disease?

Carbohydrates are the body's primary energy source; carbohydrates from meals are converted into fuel for the body. Some nutrition textbooks categorize carbohydrates as "simple" (sugars) or "complex" (starches) (starches and fibers). Simple carbohydrates, such as jam and honey, are quickly broken down by the body, resulting in a quicker rise in blood sugar levels.
Complex carbohydrates, such as oatmeal contain more fiber and are absorbed more slowly, resulting in lower blood sugar levels. This keeps you fuller for longer and helps to keep your blood sugar level. Understanding the significance of carbs can assist you in eating a balanced diet and maintaining a healthy weight, both of which are effective methods to minimize your risk of heart disease and stroke.
Low carbohydrate does not imply any carbs! A low-carb diet still contains at least 20% of the calories in the day from carbs. Low-carb diets that are well-planned contain vegetables, fruit, legumes, and even tiny amounts of nutritious grains like oats and quinoa.
Refined carbohydrates, particularly sugar-sweetened drinks, raise the risk of coronary heart disease. Whole grains and cereal fiber, on the other hand, have protective properties. Increase or reduce risk by around 10 to 20% for each additional one or two servings per day of specific foods consumed each day.
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