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Quantum Entanglement Researchers Share 2022 Nobel Prize In Physics

Quantum entanglement researchers share 2022 Nobel Prize in Physics according to a press release by the $ Nobel Prize$ . Alain Aspect of the University of Paris-Saclay, John F. Clauser of J. F. Clauser & Associates, and Anton Zeilinger of the University of Vienna all got the same prize as this year's Nobel Prize in Physics.

Alexander McCaslin
Oct 09, 20224 Shares321 Views
Quantum entanglement researchers share 2022 Nobel Prize in Physics,according to a press release by the Nobel Prize. Alain Aspect of the University of Paris-Saclay, John F. Clauser of J. F. Clauser & Associates, and Anton Zeilinger of the University of Vienna all got the same prize as this year's Nobel Prize in Physics.
Their work in quantum mechanics and quantum information sciencehelped pave the way. Working on their own, each of the three researchers came up with new ways to show and study quantum entanglement, which is a strange thing that happens when two or more particles are in a state called "entangled."
In this strange situation, if one of the particles does something, the effect can spread instantly through the whole tangled group, making it possible to predict what the other particles will do, even if they are far away.
If an observer finds out what state one of these particles is in, the other particles that are entangled with it will immediately show the same state, no matter where they are in the universe. This strange thing has become an important part of modern quantum technology, but Albert Einstein once made fun of it by calling it "spooky action at a distance" because it doesn't make sense.
"Why this happens I haven't the foggiest," In a Zoom interview, Clauser told the Associated Press that he got the official call from the Swedish Academy a few hours after friends and the media told him about his award. "I have no understanding of how it works but entanglement appears to be very real."
A golden coin with the head of Alfred Bernhard Nobel that represents the Nobel Prize
A golden coin with the head of Alfred Bernhard Nobel that represents the Nobel Prize
His fellow winners also said that they don't know how or why this effect happens. But each did experiments that got more complicated and showed that it just is. Clauser, who is 79 years old, won the prize for an experiment he did in 1972 using scraps of equipment.
This experiment helped settle a famous debate between Einstein and the famous physicist Niels Bohr about quantum mechanics. Einstein talked about "a strange thing happening far away" that he thought would be shown to be false in the end. Aspect said that Einstein may have been technically wrong, but he deserves a lot of credit for asking the right question that led to experiments that proved quantum entanglement.
In quantum entanglement, finding out what two photons that aren't close to each other have in common "lets us do things like secret communication that weren't possible before," said David Haviland, who heads the Nobel Committee for Physics. Zeilinger, who works at the University of Vienna, told a newsconference by phone that he was "still kind of shocked" to hear that he had won the award. For more than ten years, Clauser, Aspect, and Zeilinger have been talked about in relation to the Nobel Prize.
They won the Wolf Prize in Israel in 2010, which was thought to be a possible precursor to the Nobel. The Nobel committee said that Clauser made a real-world experiment out of quantum theories that were first proposed in the 1960s.
Aspect was able to fix a problem with these theories, and Zeilinger showed that something called "quantum teleportation" makes it possible to send information over long distances.

Conclusion

Monday was the first day of a week full of Nobel Prize announcements. On Monday, Swedish scientist Svante Paabo won the Nobel Prize in medicine for decoding Neanderthal DNA and learning important things about our immune system.
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