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Tricky Holiday Travel Due To Blizzard Conditions Hit Parts Of Central US

Millions of people are under winter weather alerts on Tuesday as a storm that is making blizzards hits parts of the Plains and Upper Midwest. The storm is making tricky holiday travel due to blizzard conditions.

Dr. Cooney Blades
Dec 28, 20236526 Shares133192 Views
Millions of people are under winter weather alerts on Tuesday as a storm that is making blizzards hits parts of the Plains and Upper Midwest. The storm is making tricky holiday travel due to blizzard conditions.
The National Weather Service said the "significant" winter storm with heavy snow, freezing rain, and ice that could be dangerous will last until early Wednesday morning.
The NWS warned in a midday warning that high winds and snow could bring down tree branches and power lines from the High Plains to the Northern Plains. In the meantime, it's a mix of sleet and rain in the Dakotas and northern Minnesota. This could cause up to half an inch of dangerous ice to form on roads across the area.

Tricky Holiday Travel Due To Blizzard Conditions

Card driving on the road with full of snow
Card driving on the road with full of snow
The eastern part of the US is getting ready for difficult holiday travel conditions while the central part of the country deals with the effects of deadly snow. The eastern US will not have to deal with the snow conditions that caused so much damage in the central states earlier this week. Instead, they will have steady rain that will move across the mid-Atlantic through Wednesday afternoon and reach the Northeast by Wednesday evening.
It's going to rain harder late Wednesday night and into Thursday morning. This rain is a Level 1 of 4 flood threat for big places like New York City, Washington, DC, and Philadelphia.
There may be ponding on the roads, which could slow down travel on the ground, and poor vision could cause problems with air travel. These weather threats are happening during a busy holiday week, which makes things harder for visitors.
The winter storm before this one brought heavy snow, freezing rain, and strong winds to the Plains and upper Midwest, which made a blizzard. Monday and Tuesday were the worst days of the storm, with wind gusts of up to 75 mph in some places. Blizzards, which have blowing snow and strong winds that don't let up, made things dangerous in Nebraska, South Dakota, Kansas, Colorado, and Wyoming.
Evelyn D. Reece, 86, died in a terrible crash in Pawnee County, Kansas. The storm played a part in the crash. On Christmas Day, the Nebraska State Patrol recorded about 150 weather-related incidents, such as accidents, jackknifed tractor-trailers, and road closures because of poor visibility.
Major roads, like westbound Interstate 80 and Highway 30, were closed for long periods of time, making travel very difficult. Drivers who got stuck, like Bradley Sanders and Amanda Dawn Benitez, had to look for shelter in hotels when the highways closed. Sanders, who was going from Denver to Chicago, talked about how quickly the blizzard hit, changing his plans and those of other people.

Final Words

Forecasts say that a big Christmas winter storm that has already brought heavy snow and freezing rain to the central U.S. will continue to make driving difficult. A new report from the National Weather Service early Tuesday morning said that the western High Plains would get another four to six inches of snow.
Parts of the north-central U.S. will continue to have bad winter weather from the big storm system until early Wednesday. More two to four inches of snow, with local totals of eight inches, is predicted in western South Dakota, western Nebraska, far eastern Wyoming, and northeastern Colorado. The mid-Missouri Valley may also get some lighter snow.
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