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US Special Operations Aircraft Crashes Off Japan Coast

US special operations aircraft crashes off Japan coast, leading to a search and rescue operation. The involved aircraft is an Air Force CV-22B Osprey from the 353rd Special Operations Wing, carrying eight airmen.

Alexander McCaslin
Nov 30, 20232012 Shares95815 Views
US special operations aircraft crashes off Japan coast, leading to a search and rescue operation. The involved aircraft is an Air Force CV-22B Osprey from the 353rd Special Operations Wing, carrying eight airmen. According to the Air Force Special Operations Command, the incident occurred during a "routine training mission," which resulted in an "aircraft mishap" on the coast of Japan's Yakushima Island on Wednesday.
A spokesperson for the Japanese Coast Guard reported at least one person dead in the crash. However, US officials have not officially confirmed this information, and the status of the remaining crew members remains unknown. Family notifications regarding the crash were reportedly ongoing as of Wednesday morning, according to a US military official.
Emergency personnel are on scene conducting search and rescue operations. The cause of the mishap is currently unknown.- Air Force Special Operations Command
The crash was reported to the Japanese Coast Guard around 2:47 p.m. local time, according to the spokesperson. Following the incident, the government of Japan's Okinawa Prefecture has requested the grounding of all Ospreys in the island chain. However, as of now, the US military official mentioned that no stand-down order has been issued.
Given the concerns over the danger of Ospreys, as such unexpected incident became a reality, the only thing I can say is I regret it very much.- Okinawa Gov. Denny Tamaki
The aircraft is designed for extended-range infiltration, exfiltration, and resupply missions for special operations forces, capable of performing tasks that typically require both rotary-wing and fixed-wing aircraft.
The Osprey has a historyof mechanical and operational issues leading to service member fatalities dating back to 1992. Wednesday's crash follows an incident a few months ago when three US Marines lost their lives in an MV-22B Osprey during a military exercise in Australia.
Despite historical challenges, statistically, the V-22 has an accident rate lower than some other aircraft. According to Marine Aviation spokesman Maj. Jorge Hernandez in 2022, the accident rate for the Marine variant, the MV-22, was reported at 3.16 per 100,000 flight hours. This incident also occurred approximately two weeks after five Army special operations aviators lost their lives in a training flight crash in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

Conclusion

The recent crash is not the first incident involving this aircraft in Okinawa. In December 2016, another one crash-landed in the waters off Japan's southern island of Okinawa, leading to a temporary grounding of the aircraft by the U.S. military.
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